First Intubation

I got a comment from Ashley regarding preparing for the first clinical rotation, this post is for those of you who just started school and are going to their first clinical rotation soon. The first clinical rotation is always sweet and bitter in a sense that you are excited to start the real anesthesia training but scared of the unknowns. I met some great preceptors who were encouraging but also had a couple of them who were not too friendly. My stress level went up when I knew I was going to be with those unfriendly preceptors. One thing that stressed me the most during my first rotation was intubation. It was constantly on my mind wondering when I would get the darn intubation for the first time. It was STRESSFUL. All you can think of was to get the darn tube into the right place. It took me almost 3 weeks to finally get it. I can still remember how excited I was to get my first one in — I FELT that I was on cloud 9. I am telling you all these because I wanted to let you know that you will all get there. Stress inhibits learning so I don’t want you to worry too much about your first clinical rotation. Some people may be naturally good at it and they get the tube in on their first try. Some people may have great SIM preparation before they go to clinical and they may get it in within a few attempts. But bottom line is that you do not need to worry. Just be yourself and show that you are here to learn and you all will do great!

Please let a commend if you have any questions you would like me to address.

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Ashley says:

    I was wondering if you had any tips on dealing with difficult preceptors and surgeons as an snra? Thanks love the blog please keep posting 🙂

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  2. Behind The Drape says:

    Thanks for your feedback. I will have a post about dealing with difficult preceptors next week. I have an old post titled “It is not you; it is them” which may be a good read on dealing with surgeons.

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  3. Flo says:

    Thank you for posting! I am loving the insight. Did you did it difficult to transition from ICU personalities to surgery? It seems like such a different culture

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  4. Behind The Drape says:

    I agree it is a very different environment and culture in OR. It takes a little time for some to adjust to the new culture and new routine. I find that being adaptable is the key to success. Being friendly and positive will go a long way in our career.

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